goddess rising

Goddess Rising: Sierra Frost

Every week, we are unconditionally grateful to share this space here on the Passion Yoga School blog with the phenomenal ladies of the health, wellness and personal development community. This is our opportunity to connect and collaborate with these incredible movers and shakers, as they do amazing things, follow their passions, and make the world a better place. This week, Sierra Frost took the time to share her journey with us!

 

Sierra Frost is a graduate of the Healing Arts Institute in Fort Collins, CO and Passion Yoga School in Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica. She serves clients wanting to reconnect with their bodies and free their minds, to move onto more joyous, active lifestyles after trauma. Sierra uses a combination of modalities of yoga, massage therapy, mental health awareness, mindfulness, and neurolinguistic programming in her work. With previous experience in the field of education, she maintains an informative style of communication and enjoys clients of all ages. Sierra especially lights up when she teaches through speaking events and workshops. When Sierra is not teaching or giving bodywork, you can find her writing poetry, running marathons, volunteering, and traveling the world.

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Passion Yoga School: How do you use your work as a spiritual tool?

Sierra: I believe we all have a spiritual compass. Sometimes we call this our core values, our religion, God, the universe, divinity, faith, and on and on. I believe by facilitating space for people to become aware of personal behavior patterns, we also uncover our own spirituality. When we become clear on what that is for each of us, we are able to design a lifestyle that supports our spirituality and connects us to humanity by way of knowing we ALL experience this deep essence as a compass. We can then honor our own actions, as well as the actions of others, knowing we are all doing our best with the resources we have. I practice every modality that I facilitate in my personal life. I believe to teach effectively, we need to be experiencing what we ask of our students. I know my work is a spiritual tool because I have faced my own struggles using the same practices and continue to go deeper each day. I will only ask of others what I am willing to do and be myself.

PYS: The cracks are how the light gets in. Tell us how your core wounds have inspired your work.

Sierra: I grew up being sexually abused and was put in the position of learning how to care for myself almost immediately. I experienced how our interactions with other humans can affect our lives and understanding of the world as a young child, which translated to learning what kind of world I wanted to live in and how I could use my interactions to create that world with other people. I learned to practice radical empathy through vulnerability, curiosity, and forgiveness of my family members, and ultimately myself. Upon adulthood I wanted to understand how I became a statistical anomaly in a clearer way. This motivated me to immerse myself in tangible self care skills, human development, brain science, physiology, anatomy, and philosophy of yoga. I wanted to know how stress travels through our mental, emotional, energetic, and physical bodies. I wanted to understand how divinity showed up in my personal life. I wanted to believe that I was not alone. I wanted to find the path that pushed beyond trauma, beyond what I was told, even beyond social normalcies of happiness, and into bliss. I know now this is possible. The reason behind anything I do in life is rooted in my belief that humans deserve to feel safe and have tools to create joy in this life.

PYS: What is your worst habit and what are you doing to improve it?

Sierra: My worst habit is piling on tons of commitments until I have no time or balance in my life. Sometimes it is related to attaching my worth to my accomplishments instead of knowing that I am valuable simply by being still and breathing. I have a system I created for myself to have one task per day for each facet of life. I have specific boundaries for how much time per day or week I am spending on a topic or task. This creates a space that I can address my needs in all areas, then triggers me to check in with myself and see if I am called to do more or to stop and have space. I ask people I know to hold me accountable for rest, art, and dancing because those activities rejuvenate me.

PYS: What advice would you offer to other goddesses working to actualize their potential?

Sierra: The advice I would give to other goddesses would be that no other outcome is possible besides success. When you run into an obstacle, ask everyone you know about it, research it, and use these connections and resources to move through it. We have service all around us, if we are willing to be vulnerable to say we need help, accept nobody does this life alone, and receive what is offered. The world needs your authentic passion and purpose; anything less serves no one. Be huge!!

PYS: What does your daily spiritual practice look like?

Sierra: Each evening I make sure to check my schedule for which tasks I have the next day. I plan into my schedule a grounding space where I do yoga practice, affirmations, connect to spirit through music, breath, and gratitude (mindful minutes). I revisit my spiritual plan every 3 months to rotate tools, affirmations, and mindful minutes to what serves me best according to my target goals for that season, knowing these goals are guided by my personal spiritual practice.

PYS: What secrets (past or present) have kept you from living in your truth?

Sierra: We often hide our shame and shadows from others, when these experiences are very often the fuel that manifests our destiny. Have you hidden from anything within you that has held you back in actualizing full self love?

I hid my experience of being abused for almost 20 years. It was only when I became so physically ill that I did not want to live anymore that I felt forced to share my true story with the world. I felt shame that I was not worthy of safety or love and that I needed to maintain indifference in my emotions so that I could save the world. I believed the only path to being loved was to hide what I saw as flaws. When I sense shame now, I immediately tell someone so that nothing remains secret. This is a difficult practice sometimes and I believe it grounds me to my spirituality and lifestyle.

PYS: Who inspires you? Who should we interview next?

Sierra: The people who inspire my work include Brene Brown, Elizabeth Gilbert, Louise Hay, Bessel Van Der Kolk, Jim Henry, Thomas Meyers, and the eyes of children and puppies. You should just post a lot of photos of the eyes of children and puppies looking into the reader believing that they are limitless to be anything they choose.

Goddess Rising: Stephanie Birch

Every week, we are so blessed to share this space here on the Passion Yoga School blog with some of the incredible ladies of the health, wellness and personal development community. This is our chance to connect and collaborate with these incredible movers and shakers, as they do great things, follow their passions and make the world a better place. This week, Stephanie Birch took the time to share her thoughts with us!

"I came for the sweat and found a way of life." I was hooked from my very first yoga class. As a longtime athlete, yoga was the perfect dose of physical exertion I longed for after a lifetime of sports and playing tough. It wasn’t until after I had my son that I truly began to connect with yoga as a way of life. Yoga became my breath on and off the mat, it has strengthened my mind and body, soften my shell, teaches me to live in the present, and it serves as a conduit to my Soul's purpose.

In my everyday life, I am a play-at-home mom, yoga teacher, life photographer, writer, fire-starter, online contributor, Soul Activist, Tahoe-lover, a sucker for dark chocolate, dark beer, coffee, cartwheels, boardgames, and a life well-lived barefoot and pants-less. “No pants are the best pants,” is the norm in our household. You can practice online with me at www.oneOeight.tv or in Sacramento, California. You can find me writing wide-open heart as a wanna-be comedian and squealing on my best days at www.stephynow.com.
 

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Passion Yoga School: How do you use your work as a spiritual tool?

Stephanie Birch: My work is really doing the work, no bypassing or excusing my own self-devotion. It is about showing up to the very lessons and themes I teach in a yoga class. I don't fall back on traditional texts, regurgitated cues, or lessons from another. That wouldn't be real for me. It is important for me to actively participate in this practice than cover my tracks or basis with longitude of experience.

My job, as a teacher, is to coach people to feel in a yoga class. To get absolutely in touch with themselves by challenging the physical, mental, and emotional bodies. I refuse to teach people from a place of fear or that there is only way to practice yoga. We do a disservice to teach that yoga (especially, asana) is a one-way system, as if all bodies are built the same, they are not. Alignment brings awareness, it does not keep you safe. It's important to empower people to be responsible for their practice, it's that dedication and self-awareness that keeps them encouraged. I am passionate about getting people to really fuck up the insides and get to know themselves deeply, discovering that they are their greatest teacher. It is not my job to make their time on the mat "good or bad" or that they're doing it "right or wrong." As if practicing one or two limbs of the "yoga path" is not enough, it's more than enough. It's a personal practice and the system is designed to connect you to your highest self.

It's about empowering my students, evolving the practice, and always teaching from a place of fierce love. That means getting downright uncomfortable to understand the deepest depths of ourselves, our relationships, and our lives. 

PYS: The cracks are how the light gets in. Tell us how your core wounds have inspired your work.

Stephanie: My wounds have brought me here. They have given birth to a life of getting fucking real. I used to be such a pretender, people-pleaser, and not say too much or make a stink and it furthered a career of self-doubt and staying small. My pain has been useful in my survival, overcoming the very things I thought would drown me. Going through depression, as a new mom, put our family in a tail-spin. It is not something that just goes away, it's often resting on shoulder, waiting, plotting, and planning to take it's grip again. It's taken a lot of work to get here and I'm grateful for it. My world changed when I began to understand that the Soul is both light and dark and that love is the inclusion of every emotion, it unlocks the part of you that tethered herself to traumas, abuse, and victim-hood that, although painful, gave me purpose to understanding myself. Pain is a beautiful motivator. We can sink or rise with it.

PYS: What is your worst habit and what are you doing to improve it?

Stephanie: I challenge others and myself to get out of the box of labeling things as "good" or bad" - we need to change our relationship to a gradient scale of "goodness" factor. I used to believe I was a "bad yogi" because I ate meat, drink alcohol, and don't perfectly align with the traditional teachings of the yoga path. There's a lot of shaming that goes on the yoga world and I say, "fuck that noise." It's taken years to understand myself and trust myself in this process and it certainly required me to knock down the "guru" and pedestal complexes. My worst habit, if you will, is second-guessing my intuition or not following my gut-checks with people, relationships, and teachings. Every time, I allow my intellectual to step in above my intuition, it takes the wind out of me. My practice is truly is trust and love myself deeply -- and say "no" a hell of a lot more. 

PYS: What advice would you offer to other goddesses working to actualize their potential?

Stephanie: Trust yourself. Know yourself. Love yourself. I follow along the lines of not asking for advice or giving advice. If there is someone that is coming to me for advice, I lead with questions, understanding, and charge the conversation to bring forth answers he/she already has within. We are such an advice-giving and seeking culture. We already know deep down what we need to do and most of the time, if not all, it means we need to listen to ourselves. Trust ourselves. Tune-in to this inner-knowing and guidance. We are always being guided and that means we must tune out the external to uncover our greatest potential.

PYS: What does your daily spiritual practice look like?

Stephanie: My spiritual practice is to have a human experience in this life. To live out life's ups and downs, trials and errors, and everything between. I believe that we are put on this earth to have a human experience, we are already spiritual Beings. 

PYS: What secrets (past or present) have kept you from living in your truth?

Stephanie: I think one that comes to mind, that isn't necessarily secretive, is growing up with the belief I wasn't ever going to amount to much more than a full-time job, paying bills, and calling it a life. I grew up in a low-middle class family, it's the average American story. My dad worked himself to the bone and my mom stayed home to raise 5 kids. Without being taught, per se, many of us mimic our parents and the "should-do" life. Working yourself to the bone in a job you hate because you have mouths to feed is a scary place to be, it's a trap. I openly talk about this trap and use it to encourage my path to grow and make my contribution to the world by not falling back into generational patterns and belief systems. It's how we change the world, moving away from the tribe and into your own way of life. Taking charge of my life is not easy, by any means, but it's absolutely necessary.

PYS: Who inspires you?

Stephanie: I am inspired by fire-starters and fire-breathers. Women who roar and rage. The ones in-touch with their primal, animalistic selves, speak in truths, and dance in flames. This woman, who is my sister, coach and friend, Diana Vitantonio. Belly to belly.

Goddess Rising: Margherita Feldman

Every week, we are so blessed to share this space with an amazing woman from the health, wellness and personal development community. This is our chance to connect and collaborate and this week, we are thrilled to have our very own Passion Yoga School graduate, Margherita Feldman!

I was introduced to yoga at a young age in Montessori School and was continually drawn back for the peace, joy, and light it brought to my life. I began a regular practice in 2012 as a way to exercise and relax. I stayed with yoga because of the physical, emotional, and spiritual healing it brought. After graduating college with a degree in Hospitality and Event Administration, I went into the Caribbean jungle of Costa Rica to Passion Yoga School with Adi Shakti for my ryt200. This completely transformed my practice and my life. In Costa Rica, I also received reiki initiation. I have had additional training in anatomy, nutrition, and alignment. I immediately began teaching children’s yoga, hot yoga, and all levels vinyasa flow. I now live in on the beach in California, where I teach yoga to the community. I also enjoy any flow therapy such as hula hoop, dance, and trapeze. Using Yoga, meditation, and reiki, I have found incredible healing!

Website | Graffiti Seed | Instagram | Twitter

Passion Yoga School: How do you use your work as a spiritual tool?

Margherita Feldman: Yoga, reiki, and meditation have become a great spiritual tool for me. I am finding deeper connection to my highest potential every day. I have begun unraveling the layers of conditioning from society. I was brought up to believe I needed society's approval. Through my work, I realize all that is important to me is to be is a happy, healthy, and connected to my source. I grow closer everyday. I love when my work helps others to connect with their spiritual centers as they discover a light burning inside.

PYS: The cracks are how the light gets in. Tell us how your core wounds have inspired your work.

Margherita: Without my core wounds, I would not be the beaming light I am today. I suffered much childhood pain: death of a parent, child abuse, unstable living environments, etc. This led me to trouble in my teenage years with drugs and unhealthy relationships. I was lost and in so much pain. I wanted healing. I craved the light.
Through this, I started to move towards the light and promote self healing. I realized how yoga was healing me inside and out. I wanted to continue to heal myself so I could share this magic with others. I am so proud to be healthy, happy, healing, growing, and evolving everyday! 

PYS: What is your worst habit and what are you doing to improve it?

Margherita: Currently my worst habit is being worried, confused, and feeling uncertain. I have noticed myself getting clouded by other's opinions or not being fully confident in my own. I know that my intuition knows all the right answers for my journey. If I can sit with myself and really listen to my soul, the answers will become clear. Recently I have let my mind race with worried or anxious thoughts.

PYS: What advice would you offer to other goddesses working to actualize their potential?

Margherita: You can do and be anything in this world! Whatever your heart desires: talk about it, write about it, post about it, and move your life around it! Ask yourself at the honest core of your being: What is it that is most important to you in life? Once you have found this answer, you must be brave enough to build your life around it. Find the tapas, or discipline, to keep you on the path that creates the life you want to live! You truly can be the best version of yourself with dedication to your practice.

PYS: What does your daily spiritual practice look like?

Margherita: My daily spiritual practice is crucial for me to have a "full" day. I feel incomplete if I have not done one of the following: Spend at least 30 minutes in nature- hiking, beach walking, etc. One hour yoga practice. Journaling or writing letters to friends. Meditating/ chanting/ both. Reading spiritual articles and books is also good to my soul.

PYS: What secrets (past or present) have kept you from living in your truth?

Margherita: I have often hidden from guilt and insecurities. I have approached monstrous feelings of guilt and shame from my childhood. I felt like I was not good enough to be loved as child. This carried over in to my adult life as I accepted many relationships that were unhealthy for me. I did not believe I was deserving of love, because I did not fully love myself. Through yoga and many other healing practices, I have begun a practice of self-love. It takes daily work, but I am committed to facing my demons to promote healing!

PYS: Who inspires you?

Margherita: Melanie Coons inspires me! She is an amazing health-foods chef, gymnastics coach, and yogi! She is always radiating positivity!

Goddess Rising: Alexis Sclamberg

Every week, we are so lucky to share this space with incredible women from the health, wellness and personal development community. This is our opportunity to connect and share and this week, we are happy to have Alexis Sclamberg!

Alexis Sclamberg is a personal growth writer, speaker and the co-founder of Borrowed Wisdom, a company that offers online programs to inspire and empower individuals to manifest a life they love.

A former lawyer, Alexis has been called the “manifestation master of her generation” and is known for taking the woo-woo out of the law of attraction and breaking down complex scientific facts into simple tools for manifestation. She is at work on her first book, Borrowed Wisdom For Love and is the co-creator and host of the Borrowed Wisdom interview series.

Alexis contributes personal essays to publications including Cosmopolitan, Forbes, and The Huffington Post, and has been featured on the radio, including NPR. She is an Instructor at Barnard’s Athena Center for Leadership Studies and a magna cum laude graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Facebook | Twitter | Borrowed Wisdom on Twitter | Borrowed Wisdom on Facebook

Passion Yoga School: How do you use your work as a spiritual tool?

Alexis Sclamberg: My work is focused on empowering others to live their best lives by giving them the spiritual and scientific tools to actualize their heart's desires. As a result, my work forces me to think about who I am, how I want to be in the world, and how important it is to cultivate faith in the process. Actualizing our potential on this planet while honoring our humanity requires a true test of faith -- and my work reminds me of this on a daily basis.

PYS: The cracks are how the light gets in. Tell us how your core wounds have inspired your work.

Alexis: I came to my work through my own "wounds." I was inspired to immerse myself in the world of personal growth as I was struggling in my own life--I was an unhappy lawyer in an unhappy marriage. Something needed to change. In my process of discovering the tools that were effective for me in moving my life story forward, in the direction of my heart's desires, I felt inspired to share what I had learned. And voila -- my business was born.

PYS: What is your worst habit and what are you doing to improve it?

Alexis: My worst habit is making meaning out of events that in themselves don't have meaning. We all create stories about what is happening in our lives -- we fill in the blanks, it's only natural. But far too often we assign meaning that hurts us, that causes needless suffering, that misconstrues others' intentions. The result is a lot of unnecessary pain and strife. What if we could see the events of our lives simply for what they are? What if we could take a step back and ask ourselves about the meaning we're assigning to events, and question that meaning? That's what I'm working on doing right now: stopping myself before I create a harmful narrative, giving myself and others the benefit of the doubt, and in essence, elevating my consciousness about the events of my life.

PYS: What advice would you offer to other goddesses working to actualize their potential?

Alexis: My biggest piece of advice is this: believe that anything is possible. It is my feeling that this is the most critical piece to manifestation -- belief sets everything else in motion.

Then, if I could sneak in another piece of advice, I'd say this: we can't control the "how" of our lives -- we can set intentions and create goals, but we will never be able to control how the details of our stories unfolds, nor can we control the timeline of the unfolding. This is OK. In fact, this takes a lot of pressure off us if we let it!! Stay focused on the outcome, but know that those details are just that: details.

PYS: What does your daily spiritual practice look like?

Alexis: My daily spiritual practice starts when I wake up in the morning -- I immediately do a creative visualization meditation. This helps me plug into a different "dimension" so to speak -- I get connected to my best self, the person I want to be, and suspend time and space in doing so.

I journal before I get out of bed as well; I have a practice of writing 3 things I'm grateful for, 3 things that would make the day great, and filling in one "I am" statement. These prompts each morning help me get into a space of gratitude but also train my eye on what I want to find in my day (confirmation bias!) and help me stay really intentional about my thoughts and feelings.

I then go on my daily run to the Golden Gate Bridge -- this is one of my favorite parts of my day. Running alongside the water's edge, watching the waves lap up to shore, seeing the birds soaring above me, hearing the crunch of the gravel beneath my feet, and feeling my heart beat -- I feel I am a part of something so much bigger than myself. Getting connected to the universe in this way is an important start to my day.

Throughout my day, I like to take plenty of breaks to check in with myself (how am I feeling? what messages are my body sending me?) and spend time outside. I find that I can get so sucked into the details of my work and social life, that I can forget what really matters, and what's really going on for me. By taking breaks, I ensure that I stay aware.

Before I go to sleep, I do more journaling -- reflecting on highlights from my day, listing more things I'm grateful for and reviewing what I could have done differently. The latter helps me make critical shifts in my life.

Most importantly, I exercise my "faith" muscle all day, every day. Things happen in life that test this muscle and I find myself in a constant state of "working it out." This means that I'm looking at my life through a lens of "everything's okay, everything's working out just as it should -- even if I can't really see that right now."

PYS: What secrets (past or present) have kept you from living in your truth?

Alexis: I'm an open book, to myself and to others. My business is based on this openness and authenticity, as is the book I'm writing now. I have found that it's not secrets that hold me up, but what to do with my vulnerabilities -- how to navigate through life given my set of challenges.

PYS: Who inspires you?

Alexis: My business partner and mom, Dr. Sharon Ufberg.

Goddess Rising: Loren Lotus

Every week, we get to feature an incredible woman from around the world who is part of the health, wellness or personal development community. This is our opportunity to reach out and connect with some of the amazing women who are out there doing great things. This week, we got Loren Lotus to answer our questions.

Loren Lotus is an international, Los Angeles based, passionate Yoga instructor inspired by the spiritual traditions and Yogic teachings of India. She received her certification deep in the Caribbean jungle of Costa Rica where she studied under a teacher of Akandha affiliate and was provided with a well-rounded and holistic approach to traditional Hatha Yoga.

Her teachings incorporate the spiritual traditions of India and biomechanical alignment of Kinesiology to create styles suitable for every yoga practitioner. Loren began her own Yoga practice in college where she studied Kinesiology and her fascination of the human body first stemmed. Throughout her journey of self-study and self-realization she’s found her true passion through the teachings of Yoga and creating a space of healing and compassion for the mind, body and spirit of others. She believes Yoga is a practice not only on the mat, but also off the mat, in the kitchen, in our relationships and in everyday life. As a yoga teacher and student of life, Loren strives to share her teachings and awareness of Yoga by guiding and supporting her students through their own personal practice.

Loren currently teaches private, group and special event classes in Los Angeles, California. She travels frequently for teaching opportunities around the world and hopes to expand her practice and teaching worldwide.

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Passion Yoga School: How do you use your work as a spiritual tool?

Loren: My work is a spiritual tool because it's also a part of the bigger practice of life!

Whether you're practicing Yoga, practicing the piano, or practicing other job-related functions, all of these items take dedicated time and expenditure of energy that require your attention. I use my work as a spiritual tool because I believe it's truly what I'm supposed to be doing here on earth, in this life, for this temporary amount of time. Just as you practice while you're taking a Yoga class, I've begun to find a practice each time I teach. Teaching and facilitating a class alone takes plenty of practice, piecing together poses, music, intentions, etc. and with each class I create, it's a representation of my being. With that, the most important part of this line of work is trusting.

Trusting that I'm doing what I'm supposed to be doing. Trusting that I'm capable of creating and manifesting whatever it is that I want and truly need to in order to be successful. And of course, defining "successful" to myself and not others. My idea of success may vary from someone else's in Los Angeles, but it terms of happiness, gratitude, and growth, I feel like the work I do is a huge contributing factor to my spiritual growth. 

PYS: The cracks are how the light gets in. Tell us how your core wounds have inspired your work.

Loren: Everyone has their cracks, weaknesses and wounds. It's getting through those times of challenge that create a more matured mind and soul. Whether I was a child living with my parents, in college living in a sorority, or in my 20's living on my own in a big city, each aspect of my life has come with it's own cup of tea. Most of my friends and family will probably laugh and agree that I've been (still may be) difficult, stubborn, selfish or hard to get along with at times. I realize it now looking back on some experiences and believe a lot of my past attitudes and behaviors were caused by a lack of self-awareness or respect for myself. They say how you treat others is a reflection of how you treat yourself so coming to terms with self-love, respect, awareness of myself and loved ones around me has truly expanded the purpose in the work I do now. 

PYS: What is your worst habit and what are you doing to improve it?

Loren: My honest and absolute worst habit is spreading myself thin and not honoring my boundaries. Our world and culture has so much to offer that it's hard for the mind not to wander in all places wanting this and wanting that. I often find myself thinking "what if" or "what about that." Of course, this is a blessing and a curse because having this mentality has kept me driven and on the go in various aspects of my life. But to really hammer down on improving myself to be consistent and committed, I try to tune in to what my higher consciousness really needs.

It's tempting to say "Yes!" to every opportunity that arrises (and don't get me wrong, you absolutely should say Yes!) but there comes a time when you need to honor the energy and health of your body to find stillness and simplicity in your life. I really aim to be consistent by creating a schedule, sticking to it and trusting that where I am, right here, right now, is exactly where I am supposed to be. 

PYS: What advice would you offer to other goddesses working to actualize their potential?

Loren: "Be your authentic self" because that's who you were meant to be in this lifetime. If you try to reach your potential by following in other people's footsteps, you'll certainly learn a lot from them along the way as they are resources, but the most crucial learning is what you learn from yourself. And when you learn new things, share that with others around you so they too can use you as a resource and learn things on their own! All we're really doing here is moving puzzle pieces around to find out our true purposes and maximize that potential in doing so. Also, wake up with the sun ;)

PYS: What does your daily spiritual practice look like?

Loren: Currently, my spiritual practice varies from day to day. While I do prefer routine, I've found that just went I start to build a routine, something will change and I need to reset my schedule all over again. I aim to commit my spiritual practice to sadhana first thing in the morning. Before I even walk into the kitchen for tea or breakfast, I roll out of bed and onto my mat on the floor. The first 15-45 minutes of my day consist of meditation, asana, pranayama and setting a conscious intention for the day. From there I'm off to teach at various studios, each studio offering a different class experience and varying encounters with people. Depending on how many classes I'm teaching that day, I've began to consider teaching as part of my spiritual practice as well. It's an opportune time for me to look inside of myself and share that with my students. Aside from my own personal asana practice on the mat, I try to remain tuned in throughout my entire day. Whether I'm eating vegetarian meals, humming mantras in Los Angeles traffic or going on a quiet hike by myself...again, I trust, what I'm doing is all apart of a higher practice. 

PYS: What secrets (past or present) have kept you from living in your truth?

Loren: I certainly have released several secrets through my practice in order to live fully in my truth. I love the concept of Satya, truthfulness, in not only your words but your actions and thoughts. Through this, I've found the most important part of being truthful to be with myself. I've fought through my fair share of jealously, betrayal, hatred and anger in an attempt to release negative past experiences and make room for new positive ones. I've let go of childhood traumas, past relationships and hardships, and taken on a more understanding, truthful, and grateful attitude. 

PYS: Who inspires you?

Loren: I'm inspired by so many people! I feel like each person I meet along their path has something incredible to share with me and I hope to give that back to them as well. I've surprisingly found a wonderful community of Yogis via Instagram with whom I've connected with. Kelly Pender, from Colorado is also a Yoga teacher, workshop facilitator, and lover of life upon her path!

Namaste <3