Goddess Rising: Sierra Frost

Every week, we are unconditionally grateful to share this space here on the Passion Yoga School blog with the phenomenal ladies of the health, wellness and personal development community. This is our opportunity to connect and collaborate with these incredible movers and shakers, as they do amazing things, follow their passions, and make the world a better place. This week, Sierra Frost took the time to share her journey with us!

 

Sierra Frost is a graduate of the Healing Arts Institute in Fort Collins, CO and Passion Yoga School in Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica. She serves clients wanting to reconnect with their bodies and free their minds, to move onto more joyous, active lifestyles after trauma. Sierra uses a combination of modalities of yoga, massage therapy, mental health awareness, mindfulness, and neurolinguistic programming in her work. With previous experience in the field of education, she maintains an informative style of communication and enjoys clients of all ages. Sierra especially lights up when she teaches through speaking events and workshops. When Sierra is not teaching or giving bodywork, you can find her writing poetry, running marathons, volunteering, and traveling the world.

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Passion Yoga School: How do you use your work as a spiritual tool?

Sierra: I believe we all have a spiritual compass. Sometimes we call this our core values, our religion, God, the universe, divinity, faith, and on and on. I believe by facilitating space for people to become aware of personal behavior patterns, we also uncover our own spirituality. When we become clear on what that is for each of us, we are able to design a lifestyle that supports our spirituality and connects us to humanity by way of knowing we ALL experience this deep essence as a compass. We can then honor our own actions, as well as the actions of others, knowing we are all doing our best with the resources we have. I practice every modality that I facilitate in my personal life. I believe to teach effectively, we need to be experiencing what we ask of our students. I know my work is a spiritual tool because I have faced my own struggles using the same practices and continue to go deeper each day. I will only ask of others what I am willing to do and be myself.

PYS: The cracks are how the light gets in. Tell us how your core wounds have inspired your work.

Sierra: I grew up being sexually abused and was put in the position of learning how to care for myself almost immediately. I experienced how our interactions with other humans can affect our lives and understanding of the world as a young child, which translated to learning what kind of world I wanted to live in and how I could use my interactions to create that world with other people. I learned to practice radical empathy through vulnerability, curiosity, and forgiveness of my family members, and ultimately myself. Upon adulthood I wanted to understand how I became a statistical anomaly in a clearer way. This motivated me to immerse myself in tangible self care skills, human development, brain science, physiology, anatomy, and philosophy of yoga. I wanted to know how stress travels through our mental, emotional, energetic, and physical bodies. I wanted to understand how divinity showed up in my personal life. I wanted to believe that I was not alone. I wanted to find the path that pushed beyond trauma, beyond what I was told, even beyond social normalcies of happiness, and into bliss. I know now this is possible. The reason behind anything I do in life is rooted in my belief that humans deserve to feel safe and have tools to create joy in this life.

PYS: What is your worst habit and what are you doing to improve it?

Sierra: My worst habit is piling on tons of commitments until I have no time or balance in my life. Sometimes it is related to attaching my worth to my accomplishments instead of knowing that I am valuable simply by being still and breathing. I have a system I created for myself to have one task per day for each facet of life. I have specific boundaries for how much time per day or week I am spending on a topic or task. This creates a space that I can address my needs in all areas, then triggers me to check in with myself and see if I am called to do more or to stop and have space. I ask people I know to hold me accountable for rest, art, and dancing because those activities rejuvenate me.

PYS: What advice would you offer to other goddesses working to actualize their potential?

Sierra: The advice I would give to other goddesses would be that no other outcome is possible besides success. When you run into an obstacle, ask everyone you know about it, research it, and use these connections and resources to move through it. We have service all around us, if we are willing to be vulnerable to say we need help, accept nobody does this life alone, and receive what is offered. The world needs your authentic passion and purpose; anything less serves no one. Be huge!!

PYS: What does your daily spiritual practice look like?

Sierra: Each evening I make sure to check my schedule for which tasks I have the next day. I plan into my schedule a grounding space where I do yoga practice, affirmations, connect to spirit through music, breath, and gratitude (mindful minutes). I revisit my spiritual plan every 3 months to rotate tools, affirmations, and mindful minutes to what serves me best according to my target goals for that season, knowing these goals are guided by my personal spiritual practice.

PYS: What secrets (past or present) have kept you from living in your truth?

Sierra: We often hide our shame and shadows from others, when these experiences are very often the fuel that manifests our destiny. Have you hidden from anything within you that has held you back in actualizing full self love?

I hid my experience of being abused for almost 20 years. It was only when I became so physically ill that I did not want to live anymore that I felt forced to share my true story with the world. I felt shame that I was not worthy of safety or love and that I needed to maintain indifference in my emotions so that I could save the world. I believed the only path to being loved was to hide what I saw as flaws. When I sense shame now, I immediately tell someone so that nothing remains secret. This is a difficult practice sometimes and I believe it grounds me to my spirituality and lifestyle.

PYS: Who inspires you? Who should we interview next?

Sierra: The people who inspire my work include Brene Brown, Elizabeth Gilbert, Louise Hay, Bessel Van Der Kolk, Jim Henry, Thomas Meyers, and the eyes of children and puppies. You should just post a lot of photos of the eyes of children and puppies looking into the reader believing that they are limitless to be anything they choose.