Goddess Rising: Phoebe Lapine

Every week, we are blessed to feature a woman from the health, wellness and personal development community as they do awesome things around the world. This week, we are happy to feature Phoebe Lapine!

Phoebe Lapine is a cookbook author, gluten-free chef, culinary instructor, blogger, recipe developer and wellness personality, born and raised in New York City, where she continues to live and eat. On her blog, Feed Me Phoebe, she shares her recipes for healthy comfort food, gluten-free finds and insights about balanced lifestyle choices beyond food.

In 2013, Food & Wine magazine named Feed Me Phoebe as one of the top food blogs in their first ever Digital Awards and have featured over 100 of Phoebe’s recipes on their website and in print. In 2015, Saveur nominated the site in the category of Best Special Interest Blog in their annual Food Blog Awards.

In 2015, Phoebe launched The Wellness Project, a yearlong blog series and forthcoming memoir (Pam Krauss Books / Penguin Random House, 2017) about how to find the balance between health and hedonism through a series of monthly wellness challenges.

Phoebe is also a featured Tastemaker on one of the most successful recipe aggregating sites, Foodily, and works with the meal delivery service Plated as part of their culinary council. She is a frequent contributor to Mind Body Green, Yahoo Health, Kitchen Daily and Huffington Post Taste. Her healthy recipes, writing, and cookbook have also been featured in Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, SELF, Shape, The New York Daily News, The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, O! Magazine, and Glamour Magazine, and online by Time Out New York, Saveur, Brides, Paper, Tasting Table, Serious Eats, and Design*Sponge. She is also a regular host of wellness programming for Healthination.

Website | The Wellness Project | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest 

Passion Yoga School: How do you use your work as a spiritual tool?

Phoebe Lapine: Like many people, I grew up knowing the value of good food. My mom was an early adopter of the organic movement. Long before Whole Foods popularized it, she was feeding me bowls of quinoa instead of Easy Mac. But what really compelled me to quit my day job to focus on cooking full time, and what drives me now, even when a long day over the stove feels like a chore, is the power of a meal to feed the body and soul. Everyone is nourished in different ways, and cooking gives you the power to put your own special brand of love on the plate to share with others and, more importantly, to give to yourself. Plus, caramelizing onions slowly over a low flame is a form of meditation in my book. 

PYS: The cracks are how the light gets in. Tell us how your core wounds have inspired your work.

Phoebe: My food journey, and now the work I'm doing in other areas of the wellness world, was heavily influenced by my own health struggles.

The year after I graduated from college, I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease. My doctor told me not to worry--it was totally treatable, but I would probably have to be on medication for the rest of my life. That last part didn't sit well with me. So I did what any super mature 22 year old would do in my situation: I pretended like the conversation never happened and went on living my life.

I've been trying to undue the damage of that decision for years. But I'm grateful for the initial denial. Without it, I would have probably made an equally blind decision and just followed the path that my doctor laid out for me. Instead, my health bottomed out and I had to learn how to rebuild the hard way. The experience inspired my latest book, The Wellness Project. And I hope that my experiments help others who are looking for ways to do right by their body without giving up their life.  

PYS: What is your worst habit and what are you doing to improve it?

Phoebe: I don't know if it's my worst habit--so many to choose from!--but this year I'm trying to focus on hitting the pavement more. Writing is a very isolating occupation, especially when it's cold out. I've come to realize that exercise classes are not necessarily what I need on a daily basis--it's really walking that energizes me. So I'm trying to prioritize 30 minutes of movement everyday and trying to have that translate to more time out in the open air away from my desk. 

PYS: What advice would you offer to other goddesses working to actualize their potential?

Phoebe: Sometimes you have to embrace selfishness. Honoring my energies often means saying no to a lot of other people in my life who I love dearly. Not to mention my significant other, who's much more of a night owl than I am.

I realize though that when I’m feeling my best, everything else falls into place. The people around me become more alive; the positive glow is contagious. And allowing yourself to get to that place often takes many selfish steps in between.

PYS: What does your daily spiritual practice look like?

Phoebe: I'm an inconsistent meditator, but I try to do at least 20 minutes every morning. On weekends, it's harder. My morning routine is more solid during the week, when I can work around my partner's schedule in order to get some peaceful time to myself. We have been cohabitating in a small studio apartment for five months, so carving out "me time" is a spiritual practice in and of itself!

PYS: What secrets (past or present) have kept you from living in your truth?

Phoebe: I often don't do a good enough job "living my message." There are many evenings after a long day of cooking for others when I will order a big vat of sugar-laden Thai takeout. There's nothing like carrying twenty pounds of groceries around New York City to make your biceps want to pick up the phone instead of a frying pan to get dinner on the table! But in the last year, since starting The Wellness Project, I've come clean with some of my own struggles on the cooking front. And I hope that it actually makes me a more trusted source for doable recipes and wellness advice. I'm a busy flawed person just like everyone else, and I don't have time to become a slave to the stove after working hours! 

PYS: Who inspires you?

Phoebe: Candice Kumai, Anna Watson Carl, Amie Valpone, Andie Mitchell